Let’s Create Access

Let's Create Access

Want to make your arts programming more accessible and inclusive, but don’t know where to start? Our free online arts and accessibility showcase, Let’s Create Access, can help. This free online meeting will take place on November 19, 2020 from 9 a.m. to noon(PST) on Zoom. Enjoy some inclusive stand-up comedy, learn about making the visual arts accessible through verbal descriptions, and experience verbally described artworks and performance. Learn about the history of the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) through an excerpt of the play “One Day on the Road to the ADA.” You’ll take away insights and resources that will help you ensure that your next arts program is accessible and inclusive for everyone. This online experience was developed by Jennifer Kane, Executive Director of Arts Connection, in collaboration with disability community leaders, artists, and allies. Speakers and participating artists include: Gary Ferrer, Folklorico master, Dr. Louise Fryer, author of “An Introduction to Audio Description.” Dr. Victoria Lewis, documentary theater artist and disability activist (University of Redlands), and Dr. Kate Zankowicz, inclusive arts education practitioner. Spaces are limited, so please register below to secure your spot. The last day to register for this online arts experience is November 18, 2020 at 6pm. This arts and accessibility showcase was made possible with the generous support of The California Arts Council and the National Arts and Disability Center. We look forward to meeting you!
collage of sixteen portraits one from each speaker in the event

Douglas Allen (b.1954) has worked as a studio artist at the progressive art studios of Tierra del Sol since 2009. Allen works in a variety of media to build intimate cityscapes using a psychedelic pallet. The prominent feature of these compositions are detailed diesel trucks, which he creates from memory. “I want to be a truck driver someday, but I know that’s impossible so I draw them instead,” says Allen. When he’s not making art he enjoys spending time with his dogs.

Allen has shown his work professionally in the Los Angeles area since 2009. His professional experience includes curating Microcosmic: Los Angeles at the Center of the Universe, Los Angeles City Hall Bridge Gallery, Los Angeles, California, in 2013. Additionally for this exhibition, Allen made a public presentation to the Mayor and City Leaders of Los Angeles at the Los Angeles City Hall launch celebration of the Special Olympic World Games that was broadcast on KTLA Channel 5 News. (An artist holding his artwork and smiling. He is an elder white man wearing a black baseball cap and a plaid shirt, with blue, orange and light orange colors. He is holding a drawing he made of a vibrantly colored box car.)

Janelle is 18 years old and she is a double-major in Theatre and Creative Writing at The University of Redlands. Janelle currently aspires to be a film director and to hopefully create more roles for people with disabilities. Janelle is very excited to be a part of this reading today and she hopes this helps spread some awareness!(The actor is a young Latinx woman with long black hair and black framed glasses. She  is wearing a black long-sleeved shirt and is smiling).

(The actor is a young Latinx woman with long black hair and black framed glasses. She  is wearing a black long-sleeved shirt and is smiling).

CHRIS BEACH is a Professor of Theatre Arts at the University of Redlands. Beach has directed over sixty productions in professional and academic theatre, and has received the American College Theatre Festival Award for Excellence in Theatre Education. His professional directing credits include Assistant Director, world premiere of Widows, by Ariel Dorfman and Tony Kushner (Mark Taper Forum, Los Angeles); a premiere production of Nickel and Dime, by Mark Jordan Legan (Best of the Weekend, LA Times, Hudson Theatre, Hollywood); The Firebugs, produced by Buffalo Nights Theatre Company, (four Los Angeles Dramalogue Awards). His original productions, premiered at Los Angeles Theatre Center, include Little Pictures, by Andrew Ramer, and Home Project: an Eco-Cabaret, both received Pick of the Week (LA Weekly). Beach was the founding Artistic Director of White Noise Theatre,Inc. (NYC/LA) and The Performance Loft (Redlands). In 2017, Beach was invited to stage his adaptation, Big Brother Hamlet: A Surveillance Adaptation, at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. Beach is also a theatrical consultant for corporate events and seminars

www.beachworkscoaching.com

The actor is a middle-age white man, bald with a small gray goatee, and a small hoop earring in his left ear; he is wearing a baby blue button up shirt with small white dots and white buttons

Kathryn Ervin is a professor in the Department of Theatre Arts at CSUSB. She teaches courses in Directing, Acting, Creative Drama and African American Theatre and Film and Culture. A graduate of Wayne State University and Illinois State University, she is active in numerous professional organizations. She is currently the board chair for Arts Connection, The Art Council for San Bernardino County. She is a consultant and past president for the Black Theatre Network, the national organization for artists, scholars and individuals with an interest in celebrating the beauty and complexity of black life onstage. This year she received the Kennedy Center Region VIII Gold Medallion recognizing commitment to the goals and values of the KCACTF and educational theatre. (The actor is a middle-aged African American woman with short curly black-ish gray hair; she is wearing medium sized gold hoops, black framed glasses, a purple scarf and patterned pink top) (The actor is a middle-aged African American woman with short curly black-ish gray hair; she is wearing medium sized gold hoops, black framed glasses, a purple scarf and patterned pink top)
Born and raised in Mexico, Gary Ferrer moved to San Bernardino 13 years ago and began to establish himself as a fitness instructor and photographer. He had begun shooting for a well-known fashion designer in Los Angeles. In December of 2016, he was rushed to the hospital with severe headaches and eventually diagnosed with meningitis. After being told he had only 12 days to live, he recovered, but not before the disease took his eyesight. After spending two months in the hospital and overcoming more months of depression, Ferrer decided to use his strength for others by starting a folklorico dance group for low income kids at his own dance studio in San Bernardino, CA. Folklorico is meaningful to Ferrer because of the way it represents Mexican Culture through music, wardrobe, and choreography. The group performs at venues such as the Orange County Fair, Plaza Olvera in Los Angeles, The NASCAR Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, the Festival of Lights in Riverside, and the Women’s March. Ferrer’s group is not just about dance however. One of their goals is to better the community. They participate in park clean-ups and prepare lunches for the homeless. Their hope is to get involved in even more activities such as visiting children’s hospitals and attending to animals in shelters. His success and dedication to the San Bernardino community has been astounding. He has been identified as a FAB-47 by assembly member Reyes and formally recognized by assembly members Medina and Steinorth, and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti. He has been awarded by the cities of San Bernardino, Carson, and Riverside. He has also appeared in newspapers such as the San Bernardino Sun, Press Enterprise, El Chicano, and Le Prensa and appeared on Telemundo, Uni Vision, CBS, and American Latino TV, Spectrum, and many more. (The dancer is a Mexican American man wearing a red and white striped button up shirt; his hair is mid length on top and shaved along the sides with a blonde streak down the middle) (The dancer is a Mexican American man wearing a red and white striped button up shirt; his hair is mid length on top and shaved along the sides with a blonde streak down the middle)
Dr Louise Fryer is one of the UK’s most experienced describers. She has described at the National Theatre since it started offering AD in 1993. She also works closely with VocalEyes. With the BBC, she helped develop Europe’s first pilot TV Audio Description Service (AUDETEL). She has described films and was the accessibility advisor for the BAFTA-nominated Notes on Blindness (2016). She has written audio guides and audio descriptive guides and given live audio-described tours for many museums and galleries including Tate Britain, Tate Modern, The Natural History Museum and the V&A. Most recently she described the Ed Sheeran exhibition at Christchurch Mansion in Ipswich. She advises curators on making collections more accessible, including the Handel Hendrix Museum in London, and the Science Gallery in Dublin. She has run courses for theatre, screen and museum describers in the UK, Switzerland, India and Australia. She was a partner in the Erasmus+ funded research project ADLAB-PRO. Her descriptions of dance have seen her describe with 2Faced Dance, Neon Dance and the Spanish National Dance Company. Her book An Introduction to Audio Description: A Practical Guide (2016) is published by Routledge. She is especially interested in developing integrated approaches, working with curators and companies from the start of projects rather than being brought in to describe at the end. She is a Research Fellow at the University of Surrey. (The speaker is a middle-age white woman with green eyes and short brown hair parted to the left; she is wearing an orange scarf and pink button up shirt and looking off to her right).

Laura Hernandez(she/ella/they/them) is an Indigenous Xicana stand-up comedian, public speaker, actress, writer, poet/spoken word artist, and an Indigenous Rights and Disability Justice advocate from San Bernardino, CA. Born with Marfan Syndrome, Laura lives with multiple disabilities including complete blindness. She has acquired several academic degrees and certificates including a B.A. in Sociology, B.A. in History with an emphasis on Ethnic Studies, and a Certificate in Gerontology. As well as has much experience in community organizing and advocacy work. In 2018, Laura made her TV debut featured on the first-ever televised native stand-up comedy series; First Nations Comedy Experience. She has also been featured on several podcasts and continues to perform and speak on various platforms. You can follow them across social media as Laura Hernandez @badassblindcomic or email at: badassblindcomic@gmail.com.

(The comedian and speaker is an Indigenous Xicana woman with long black hair; she is wearing a white blouse with blue embroidery along the neck and down the front; she is wearing long beaded turquoise earrings)

(The comedian and speaker is an Indigenous Xicana woman with long black hair; she is wearing a white blouse with blue embroidery along the neck and down the front; she is wearing long beaded turquoise earrings)

Devin Hicks is originally from San Francisco California, and is currently a Senior at the University of Redlands. Devin is obtaining his bachelors in Theatre business and Masters in Education. Devin is a trained dancer and teaches locally within the Inland Empire. After graduation Devin hopes to continue working in the performing arts and furthering his artistic career.

(The actor is young African American man, smiling at the camera, wearing a charcoal gray quarter-zip sweater, reddish-orange shirt underneath and blue jeans)

(The actor is young African American man, smiling at the camera, wearing a charcoal gray quarter-zip sweater, reddish-orange shirt underneath and blue jeans)

Jonathan Jackson, a master collageist and painter, has worked with Tierra del Sol Studios since 2010. Jonathan’s paintings are often based on his collaged compositions.  Here he is at “Summary Appeal”, a show installed at the Good Luck Gallery and curated by Doug Harvey. Jonathan’s pieces are above him and on the right side of the image.

The image is a photograph of a man standing in front of 11 artworks. He is wearing a colorful patterned shirt with a black collar. (provided by Tierra and the artist

The image is a photograph of a man standing in front of 11 artworks. He is wearing a colorful patterned shirt with a black collar. (provided by Tierra and the artist)

Jennifer Kane is an artist, arts organizer, and teacher from Los Angeles, CA and currently resides in Joshua Tree. She serves as the Executive Director of Arts Connection, the Arts Council of San Bernardino County. Jennifer received her BA in Fine Arts from Mount St. Mary’s College and her MFA in Public Practice from Otis College of Art and Design. She is a recent graduate of Arts for LA’s ACTIVATE Cultural Policy Fellowship program.

Jennifer’s multidisciplinary practice approaches community engagement as a dynamic form of art: creating space and opportunities for people to gather in unexpected environments through diverse methods and mediums to promote broader understanding and connection to self, others, and place. Organizing community outreach events in Peace Corps Thailand from 2006-2008 helped generate her passion for this deeply relational work. Jennifer further developed her skills as a teacher of geology, human history, and ecology as a guide for over a decade in the Sierra Nevada range of California. It is her work here that roots her attention to our deep connections to the land and each other.

Jennifer’s writing has been featured in KCET Artbound and as part of the Mojave Project. Her paintings are held in private collections across the world. Jennifer is a proud board member of Californians for the Arts, the California Arts Advocates, and the Board of Advocates for the Robert and Frances Fullerton Museum of Art (RAFFMA).

(This speaker is a young white woman with dirty blonde hair below her shoulders, wearing a beige sweater with a diagonal stripe of fabric offset across the stomach.)

(This speaker is a young white woman with dirty blonde hair below her shoulders, wearing a beige sweater with a diagonal stripe of fabric offset across the stomach.)

Victoria Lewis. Founding Director Other Voices Mark Taper Forum. Professor Theatre Arts, University of Redlands.

Victoria  is a pioneer in theatre and disability, working since the 1980s in a variety of theatrical models—grassroots, community-based, regional not-for-profit, and television and film. In 1982, with the support of an Artist in Residence in the Communities grant from the California Arts Council (CAC), Victoria founded the Other Voices Project at Los Angeles’s Mark Taper Forum, dedicated to providing theatre training for people with disabilities and creating texts to challenge the depiction of disability in drama and the mass media. For the next 20 years, as a member of the Artistic Staff at the Taper, Victoria developed strategies for cultural enfranchisement of marginalized communities. In 2000 she received a PhD in Theatre from UCLA and joined the Theatre Arts faculty at the University of Redlands. 

Victoria is the editor of Beyond Victims and Villains: Contemporary Plays by Disabled Playwrights, Theatre Communications Group, 2006, the first anthology of American plays by writers with disabilities. Her current project is a verbatim documentary play, One Day on the Road to the ADA: September 27, 1988, developed from the congressional record and Disability Civil Rights archives. Recent publications include: “A Great and Complicated Thing: Reimagining Disability,” in Casting a Movement: The Welcome Table Initiative, Routledge, 2019; “Hands like starfish/ Feet like moons’: Disabled Women Theatre Collectives,” in Women and Collective Creation, Palgrave, 2016. She is included in the Disability Civil Rights Oral History Project at UC Berkeley.

The actor and speaker is a white woman with short, light brown hair held lightly back by a pair of brown glasses. She is wearing a beige suit jacket and a black shirt underneath.

The actor and speaker is a white woman with short, light brown hair held lightly back by a pair of brown glasses. She is wearing a beige suit jacket and a black shirt underneath.

Katie has a deep interest in the world around her and she thoughtfully shares with others her insights on a wide variety of subjects. She is an explorer and inspires those around her with a positive inquisitiveness. Katie seeks daily to to expand her skills and is a naturally talented artist and teacher. Everyday she has something brilliant to share. 

Katie creates and designs characters and stories for movies. She recently designed and made a set of tarot cards and does readings. Her paintings, drawings and sculpture generally have a surprise element to draw the viewer in. (The artist is a young Latinx woman wearing metal framed glasses and leather strung necklaces of various lengths. She is wearing ski goggles on the top of her head, a red knit beanie and a camo jacket)

(The artist is a young Latinx woman wearing metal framed glasses and leather strung necklaces of various lengths. She is wearing ski goggles on the top of her head, a red knit beanie and a camo jacket)

Jackie Marsh is a prolific artist. She enjoys working at Tierra’s studios and continuously inspires those around her. She has an extraordinary gift for art making and teaching and she continually works to master new techniques. Jackie loves to connect with others, is always supportive and easily shares her knowledge with others.  She respects the critique of her mentor and peers, and in turn, Jackie gives thoughtful insights and advice.  She is very kind and motivates all of those around her. 

Jackie’s subject matter for her art works include flowers, animals and self-portraits. In her paintings and drawings she builds dynamic compositions with vibrant colors and expressive shapes. Her highly stylized ceramic sculptures of whimsical animals uniquely express her personal vision and care for the natural world.

(The artist is seated working on a painting on the table in front of her. She is a young white woman with short light brown hair and bangs; she is wearing a gray t-shirt and a red apron.)

Alan Toy is an innovator, a community organizer, a dedicated civil rights activist and an accomplished actor, appearing in more than fifty television shows and motion pictures, including The Aviator, In the Line of Fire, Kansas, Beverly Hills 90210 and Matlock.

He has been an elected and appointed member of many state and local boards and commissions. He has been a consultant on many disability-related projects and is a frequent keynote speaker and panelist.  Alan was the associate director of a research center in the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs, and also the executive director of one of the oldest Independent Living Centers in the U.S.

Alan has worked tirelessly in the disability and senior communities to increase individual and community-based self-sufficiency. His advocacy in mass media entertainment and the Screen Actors Guild has not only paved the way for many other disabled performers to have successful careers, but has also given viewers around the world a new way of seeing people with disabilities portrayed on television and in films.

His union organizing work for SEIU helped create a new paradigm of in-home care for many thousands of healthcare workers and their clients. His innovative projects in web-based accessibility mapping were twice finalists for the Harvard University Ash Institute’s Innovations in American Government Award.

Alan serves on the board of directors of the ACLU of Southern California, where he has held several offices, including affiliate president. He was also a member of the national ACLU board for nine years.

(The actor is an older white man with blue eyes and grayish brown hair, wearing a black sweater over a light blue, collared shirt.)

(The actor is an older white man with blue eyes and grayish brown hair, wearing a black sweater over a light blue, collared shirt.)

Kate Zankowicz (she/her/hers) is a museum education practitioner who has created community-driven, inclusive programming in museums in Canada and the US for the past 15 years. Her practice has centered around creating collaborative programming with, not for, communities. 

Kate holds a PhD in Education, with a focus on museum-based education and the history of accessibility in museums, from the University of Toronto (OISE). She currently serves as the Manager of Youth, Family and Community Engagement at The Huntington Library, Art Museum and Botanical Gardens. 

During her current tenure at the Huntington, Kate introduced the first occupational therapy doctoral student residency, as well as garden-based and arts-based programming with families of all abilities. She also implemented free preschool arts programming, free drop-in multilingual family programs, and  multisensory tours with blind and partially sighted community members.

Kate designs, develops and implements inclusive curricula and museum experiences, and speaks regularly about inclusive museum education at local and international conferences. She also serves on the DEI Committee at The Huntington and is involved with various cross-institutional DEI initiatives in Los Angeles.

(A smiling white woman with long brown hair wearing a floral patterned top with black sleeves)

(A smiling white woman with long brown hair wearing a floral patterned top with black sleeves)

Tierra Del Sol – Artist Showcase

Tierra del Sol
A strong and vibrant community is one in which all of its members contribute to the strengths and assets for the common good. Tierra’s mission is to empower people with disabilities to fulfill their potential and desire to become productive citizens who are accepted, included and valued for the contributions they make to the economic, civic, and cultural vitality of the community. We are actively working towards the day when people with any type of disability are fully recognized as an integral part of our community – as neighbors, co-workers, and contributors.

yellow sun with lots of black rays coming out around the top

Douglas Allen

(An artist holding his artwork and smiling. He is an elder white man wearing a black baseball cap and a plaid shirt, with blue, orange and light orange colors. He is holding a drawing he made of a vibrantly colored box car.)

Douglas Allen (b.1954) has worked as a studio artist at the progressive art studios of Tierra del Sol since 2009. Allen works in a variety of media to build intimate cityscapes using a psychedelic pallet. The prominent feature of these compositions are detailed diesel trucks, which he creates from memory. “I want to be a truck driver someday, but I know that’s impossible so I draw them instead,” says Allen. When he’s not making art he enjoys spending time with his dogs.

 

Allen has shown his work professionally in the Los Angeles area since 2009. His professional experience includes curating Microcosmic: Los Angeles at the Center of the Universe, Los Angeles City Hall Bridge Gallery, Los Angeles, California, in 2013. Additionally for this exhibition, Allen made a public presentation to the Mayor and City Leaders of Los Angeles at the Los Angeles City Hall launch celebration of the Special Olympic World Games that was broadcast on KTLA Channel 5 News.

Douglas Allen (Down 65) (What?) This is a colourful cartoon-style drawing in felt-tip pen on paper – A3 size. It’s unframed, in landscape, so wider than it is tall, and measures approx. 11.5 by 16.5 inches – although as this is a digital exhibition it can be as big or small as your browser can make it! (Who?/ When?) It’s by Douglas Allen, born. in 1954, who comes from the LA area and used to be a trucker. He has drawn on his own experience to create this and other contemporary pieces on the same theme. (What?) Called Down 65, It shows a massive diesel truck driving down a mountain road from right to left. The truck fills most of the paper, which is completely coloured in, so no trace of the underlying white surface remains. The truck is a bright electric blue with a silver-grey top and red wheel arches and tyres. Clouds of brown smoke puff from its twin silver-coloured exhausts that stick up either side of the cab. The driver looks out over the red and blue hood that has bars and a large front grille, giving the truck a snub-nosed appearance. The front bumper is striped grey and pink and the license plate bears the words Joe Cool. (Where?) The truck occupies most of a single lane brown roadway that’s edged by a low safety barrier with a sheer wall of red-brown rock below and more towering up behind dotted with some individual rocks circled in grey and pink. Above the cab to the left, the curving mountain ridge meets a deep blue sky with light-blue puffy clouds and a round yellow sun. Words are written on the side of the truck: In a yellow cloud or speech bubble towards the front it proclaims “From Heaven” and above the double wheel arch towards the back a light blue cloud or speech bubble contains the words “Riding on Air” (Why?) A bio tells us: Douglas Allen (b.1954) has worked as a studio artist at the progressive art studios of Tierra del Sol since 2009. Allen works in a variety of media to build intimate cityscapes using a psychedelic pallet. The prominent feature of these compositions are detailed diesel trucks, which he creates from memory. “I want to be a truck driver someday, but I know that’s impossible so I draw them instead.” Duration: 402 words – roughly 2 mins.

Jonathan Jackson

The image is a photograph of a man standing in front of 11 artworks. He is wearing a colorful patterned shirt with a black collar. (provided by Tierra and the artist

Jonathan Jackson, a master collageist and painter, has worked with Tierra del Sol Studios since 2010. Jonathan’s paintings are often based on his collaged compositions. Here he is at “Summary Appeal”, a show installed at the Good Luck Gallery and curated by Doug Harvey. Jonathan’s pieces are above him and on the right side of the image.

Image description to the left: The image is a photograph of a man standing in front of 11 artworks. He is wearing a colorful patterned shirt with a black collar.

This piece is called Birds, by Johnathan Jackson and was created in 2011. Jonathan Jackson, a master collageist and painter, has worked with Tierra del Sol Studios since 2010. Jonathan’s paintings are often based on his collaged compositions.

Birds by Johnathan Jackson

 

This verbal description will be created at our event on November 19, 2020.

 

Image description:

This piece is called Birds, by Johnathan Jackson and was created in 2011. Jonathan Jackson, a master collageist and painter, has worked with Tierra del Sol Studios since 2010. Jonathan’s paintings are often based on his collaged compositions.

Jackie Marsh

Jackie Marsh is a prolific artist. She enjoys working at Tierra’s studios and continuously inspires those around her. She has an extraordinary gift for art making and teaching and she continually works to master new techniques. Jackie loves to connect with others, is always supportive and easily shares her knowledge with others. She respects the critique of her mentor and peers, and in turn, Jackie gives thoughtful insights and advice. She is very kind and motivates all of those around her. Jackie’s subject matter for her art works include flowers, animals and self-portraits. In her paintings and drawings she builds dynamic compositions with vibrant colors and expressive shapes. Her highly stylized ceramic sculptures of whimsical animals uniquely express her personal vision and care for the natural world. Jackie Marsh has worked as a studio artist at the progressive art studios of Tierra del Sol since 2009. Marsh produces whimsical depictions of animals and flowers in painting, drawing and ceramics. In both her two and three dimensional work, gestural mark-making is combined with a vibrant and loosely applied color palette to define her delightfully exuberant style. In addition to being a studio artist, Marsh also teaches art classes at Upland Art Studios, the Joslyn Senior Center and other venues. Her work has been exhibited at such venues as the Chan Gallery, Pomona College, Claremont, California; California Baptist University, Riverside, California; Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, California and Zask Gallery, Palos Verdes, California. When she’s not developing her art career, you can find Marsh at work providing compassionate care to the animals of local animal shelters.
Jackie Marsh – untitled. This untitled drawing in acrylic on paper makes me smile. It’s in portrait (taller than it is wide)and shows a furry creature – probably a dog – sitting on a flat brown rectangle that runs across the bottom, the full width of the paper. The dog’s fur is suggested by squiggles of light grey. His pert ears are pink inside and turned towards us. He has beady black eyes set either side of a squarish black nose and a little pink tongue lolls from his upward-curving mouth. The swirl of his fur carries a suggestion of raised front paws. He could be real or a cuddly toy propped on the end of a bed. The backdrop could be wallpaper – or an imaginary landscape- a dark plum colour decorated with lots and lots of closely spaced flowers. Each bloom has a circular yellow centre outlined in black with petals of white, pink or yellow conveying a sense of fun and happiness. Her bio tells us that Jackie Marsh is a prolific artist whose subject matter includes flowers, animals and self-portrait whose vibrant colors and shapes express her personal vision and care for the natural world. She says: “I like to paint flowers a lot which is why I have flowers in so many paintings and they are carved into my sculptures. When I’m not at the gallery, I take care of my animals. I don’t have time to make art at home because I am busy being inspired by my pets.” 252 words (approx. 1 min 30 secs)

Katie Mendoza

Katie has a deep interest in the world around her and she thoughtfully shares with others her insights on a wide variety of subjects. She is an explorer and inspires those around her with a positive inquisitiveness. Katie seeks daily to to expand her skills and is a naturally talented artist and teacher. Everyday she has something brilliant to share. 

Katie creates and designs characters and stories for movies. She recently designed and made a set of tarot cards and does readings. Her paintings, drawings and sculpture generally have a surprise element to draw the viewer in. 

 

This is a ceramic sculpture by Katie Mendoza, an artist, educator and curator. According to her bio: Katie creates and designs characters and stories for movies. She recently designed and made a set of tarot cards and does readings. Her paintings, drawings and sculpture generally have a surprise element to draw the viewer in.

Katie Mendoza, Ceramic Sculpture
[this description will be created with participation from the audience at our event on November 19, 2020]

This is a ceramic sculpture by Katie Mendoza, an artist, educator and curator. According to her bio:

Katie creates and designs characters and stories for movies. She recently designed and made a set of tarot cards and does readings. Her paintings, drawings and sculpture generally have a surprise element to draw the viewer in.

 
 
 
Description coming soon….